The Buzz

Construction, Exports, New Uses and a Barton County Land Sale.

If you’ve been wondering where “The Buzz” has gone to; well, we’ve been busy. Not that there’s been any shortage of wheat- or Kansas-related ag news.

  • One thing we’ve had our hands full of is … construction. The Kansas Wheat Commission and Kansas Association of Wheat Growers are nearing the end of construction of the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center, a state-of-the-art wheat research complex near the K-State campus in Manhattan. Click here for construction updates on the Innovation Center… 
  • The goal of the Innovation Center is to improve wheat yields in Kansas and surrounding states. Not that wheat is a big crop in northeast Kansas, but still, we’re impressed at the commitment The Scoular Company is making with its new shuttle-train-loading grain handling facility with the Union Pacific near Willis in Brown County…
  • Construction of the grain-handling facility is scheduled to begin in the fall of 2012. When complete, the facility will feature high-speed truck unloading and grain drying capacity to benefit area farmers. The site will accommodate a loop track for up to 120 rail cars as well as Union Pacific shuttle loading/unloading capability for grains and fertilizer…
  • All eyes are on the wheat market, with global weather concerns affecting production in some of the biggest competitors to the U.S. in world wheat supplies. Russia’s Deputy Ag Minister has cut the nation’s wheat crop estimate by nearly 5%, to 40 million metric tons, due to drought. To compare, Russia’s crop totaled nearly 42 million metric tons in 2010, when Russia decided to ban wheat exports.  Meanwhile, Reuters reports that Ukraine will likely limit wheat exports in 2012-13 to just 4 million metric tons, due to widespread drought limiting that nation’s production. The upshot of all of this is that countries that used to import wheat primarily from the Black Sea region may need to look elsewhere. Thus, countries like Egypt – one of the world’s largest wheat importing nations – could look to the U.S. to supply its wheat needs for the coming year…
  • Here at home, leaving volunteer wheat unchecked this close to planting the 2013 crop can severely damage wheat crops, reports Tim Unruh, reporter for the Salina Journal. In his September 2 front page article, Unruh writes that central Kansas farmers sustained more than $30 million in lost revenue due to diseases like Barley Yellow Dwarf and wheat streak mosaic virus. Both can be caused by letting volunteer wheat survive too long in the fall… 
  • Some farmers in north central Kansas considered suing neighbors who didn’t destroy volunteer wheat. Part of being a good neighbor, of course, is to do treat others as you want to be treated. Therefore, kill your volunteer wheat! … 
  • Have you heard of Dr. William Davis? He’s the author of the book, “The Wheat Belly Diet,” which decries wheat foods as a leading cause of obesity and illness in Americans today. Frankly, Dr. Davis is a bit of a thorn in our sides, particularly as the “gluten-free” fad is sweeping the nation. He was recently featured in a CBS news interview about the detrimental effects of wheat foods and modern wheat breeding techniques. He calls wheat foods “The Perfect Poison.”… 
  • Judi Adams, who runs the Wheat Foods Council, offered an opinion piece to the Wichita Eagle a few months ago that continues to make sense today. The WFC, incidentally, is funded in part by Kansas wheat farmers through the wheat checkoff…
  • We’re all about finding new uses for wheat products, and it’s good news that MGP Ingredients is producing a new bio-based resin material made from wheat- and corn-based materials at its Onaga plant. Called “TerraTek,” the white, pellet-size resins, “…can be easily processed, shaped and colored by finished goods manufacturers to meet their specific product designs and needs.” …
  • This week’s Land Sale features 640 acres of Barton County dryland, located just northwest of Galatia. The sale included surface rights only; mineral rights were retained by the seller. Tracts 1, 2, and 3 sold as one unit as “Tract 4.” They included about 440 acres of cropland, with the balance in pasture. Tract 4 sold for $825,600 ($1,720 per acre). Tract 5, 160 acres, had 120 acres of cropland and the balance in pasture. It sold for $316,000 ($1,975 per acre). Sellers “were pleased with the results,” according to representatives from Carr Auction and Realty, Larned, which had the sale.
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One Response to The Buzz

  1. Bill,
    I find it interesting that while Dr. Davis is trying to convince the American public that the wheat of our generation isn’t “real” and is poisonous, the USDA and First Lady, Michelle Obama, is requiring all school districts to adhere to new, more strict breakfast/lunch requirements that allow ONLY whole grain breads. Contradicting?

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