The Buzz

Wheat Blast, Wheat Research, a Wheat Blog and Wheat Farms for Sale.

Wheat news from the University of Kentucky is that “Wheat Blast,” an emerging threat to wheat production worldwide, was discovered in wheat research plots in that state a year ago. This is the first confirmed report of Wheat Blast outside of South America, where it has been known to completely destroy wheat fields. University of Kentucky researchers are encouraging farmers in that state to scout fields for the disease now. 

  • Wheat Blast is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae/Pyricularia grisea, and was detected in Brazil in 1985. Currently, there are no known resistant varieties; fungicide products have been ineffective. While this is the first discovery outside South America, a related pathogen has been discovered in annual and perennial ryegrass fields in several Delta states…
  • Specialists at the University of Kentucky are working with the International Wheat Blast Consortium, led by researchers at K-State. The group is trying to identify wheat varieties resistant to wheat blast, and characterize the wheat blast pathogen using molecular markers…
  • This video explains more about the International Wheat Blast Consortium objectives…

  • Wheat Blast is scary stuff, but it appears that it can be managed by using good seed management. However, it reinforces the importance of wheat research at our land-grant universities and USDA. Trouble is, federal funding cuts leave many research programs shorthanded. The Kansas Wheat Commission Research Foundation will help pick up the slack in wheat research; donations to the KWCRF will help permanently fund research by K-State. Check out the Web site: http://www.kansaswheatresearch.org to learn how you can help…
  • Speaking of wheat research, a Big Ol’ Buzz Salute to Clayton Seaman, who last week was named one of Kansas State University’s 2012 “Classified Employees of the Year.” Seaman joined the Hays Ag Research Center in 1986 and worked alongside wheat breeder Joe Martin until his retirement earlier this year; he now works with wheat breeder Guorong Zhang in Hays. Seaman received his award from Kirk Schultz, president of K-State.
  • Clayton is a great friend to the wheat farmers of Kansas, and we congratulate him for being recognized for a job well-done…
  • An interesting article in the online magazine Slate examines several ways in which global hunger can be alleviated. Chief among them: investing more money in crop research to thwart problems like rust in wheat; and environmental stresses like drought, salt tolerance and nutrient deficiency…
  • Lest you think these are the conclusions of a bunch of commodity or advocacy groups, these are global recommendations from the “Copenhagen Consensus” and Nobel laureate economists…
  • Isn’t it interesting that while so many people go hungry around the world, here in the U.S. we take food for granted…and that we can afford to be so choosy about the foods we eat? A member of the “Wheat Family,” Kara Rowe, began writing about her month off of gluten foods in a blog called, “My Wheat Belly.” According to an article in the Capital Press, Rowe – who is director of outreach for the Washington Association of Wheat Growers – has come under fire for her blog, by folks from both the pro- and anti-wheat community…
  • Rowe quit eating foods containing for one month, to raise awareness about the nutritional benefit of grains, and the need for a well-balanced diet. Though folks with celiac disease cannot have wheat foods – many folks have climbed on the “gluten-free” bandwagon as a fad diet. Many comments from fanatical gluten-free fans have been heated at best, hateful at worst, she reports…
  • In this week’s Land Sale, 320 acres of dryland farmland southeast of Kalvesta in Hodgeman County sold May 3. There were two adjoining tracts sold as one unit; Tract 1 had 149 acres of cropland, the balance in grass. Tract two had 131 acres of cropland and the balance in grass. On the two tracts, 103 acres were planted to wheat; the buyer receives 100% of the crop. The buyer also received 50% of the property’s mineral rights…
  • The land sold for $454,400 ($1,420 per acre), about what the auctioneers expected it would go for, according to the folks at Farm and Ranch Realty, Colby, which had the sale.
Advertisements
This entry was posted in The Buzz and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Buzz

  1. Pingback: Today In Kansas » The Buzz

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s